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to bring in james cavanaugh, nbc news law enforcement analyst and former atf special agent in charge. and with us -- he's with us from nashville. here with me in the studio, robert mcfadden is a former senior ncis official and senior vice president at the suffan group. james, i have to ask you, we've seen so much wild speculation recently. we've seen photos on the cover of the "new york post" that we're not going to show because they turned out to be wrong. how much of that actually ends up harming an investigation by creating sort of false starts? >> well, it is complicated to an investigation, and the commanders, you know, have to wrestle with that in a big media case like this. the even steady reporting is good because it kind of keeps it on the level, just like you saw pete do, it's very pragmatic. so it's difficult to deal with it when you're running a big case like this. for example, the d.c. sniper. we had a lot of issues like that as well. you know, the frenzy to get the story first out. you know, it's not really a necessary -- it's better to get it accurate. this case is mov
a primary vote. >> senator manchin called every nra talking point hogwash, laws. he was very strong. yet the hogwash and lies seem to be working. >> seem to be working because they always work. h is what the nra does. we knew this after newtown when, you know, all the energy bubbled up. folks were calling for an assault weapons ban and background checks and straw purchases and bills on trafficking, that the nra would somehow find a way to keep this from happening. the nra has been around a long time. the energy and passion we saw from december 14th has to continue. what happens today, what's happening in the senate right now, shouldn't be something that deters those newtown families and all those other families in cities across the country from pushing to get something done. this is a long haul process. this is not something that turns on, you know, one failed vote. >> isn't there a risk? one of the things that strikes me, we're talking about a vote on a watered down bill. progressives and people supporting the legislation have even said, is it really what we want? no. is it the best we
involvement. >> the reports of involvement by her husband and brother-in-law came as an absolute shock to them all. >> and in dagestan, the suspect's mother is adamant that her sons are innocent. >> what happened is a terrible thing, but i know that my kids have nothing to do with this. i know it. i am mother. >> joining us now from boston is nbc news national investigative correspondent michael isikoff. and frank silufo, director of the homeland security policy institute at george washington university. good afternoon, to both of you. mike, as the investigations continue both here and oversea, we understand that investigators are confident these brothers acted alone. even as their family members express utter bafflement. what are we learning about the larger case against these suspects? >> reporter: well first of all, this is looking, martin, more and more like a case of self-radicalization. now, nothing is conclusive and, you know, we're far from the end of this investigation right now. >> of course. of course. >> reporter: but the preliminary indicators, first, you have tsarnaev saying the
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